Calendar

Select one or more Categories to view calendar items for Readings, Workshops, Conferences, Calls for Submission, Contests, and Volunteer Opportunities.

The Disclaimer: OPA does not guarantee the information in this calendar to be complete or accurate so be sure to check the organization's web site for submission details, and good luck!

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[ai1ec view="monthly" cat_name="readings,workshops,conferences,calls-for-submissions,volunteer-opportunities"]
Jan
27
Wed
2021
{Workshop} The Heartfelt & Heartbroken: Writing Evocative Love Poems @ Zoom
Jan 27 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm

To register, email [email protected]

Are you ready for Valentine’s Day? Is there someone in your life, present or past (even future) that you’d like to write a poem for?

In this intensive generative workshop, we will explore the many facets of writing “love poetry”, from the ecstatic to the melancholic, from discovering that intimate connection to finding uniquely evocative ways of expressing that connection through poetry. We will study how best to show true emotion without leaning too heavily into sentimentality, as well exploring poems that deal with loss of a loved one.

We will analyze diverse poems from contemporary poets, followed by hands-on writing activities, prompts, and plenty of in-class writing time.

FOR FAMILIES: Tardeada de Poesia (Poetry Afternoon) with Claudia Castro Luna @ Online
Jan 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Calling all kids and families:

Join Columbia Riverkeeper and special guest, Claudia Castro Luna, for an afternoon of poetry for the family. This is a kid-friendly poetry workshop, all in Spanish, that will focus on themes around the environment and river ecosystems. Kids and their families will have the opportunity to write poetry, draw, and publish their work on Columbia Riverkeeper’s website. This event will be instructed and taught in Spanish and kids and families are welcome to speak in whatever language is comfortable for them.

Feb
1
Mon
2021
The Poetry Box Chapbook Prize-2021 @ via Submittable
Feb 1 – Feb 28 all-day

THE POETRY BOX CHAPBOOK PRIZE – 2021

It’s time for the fourth annual Poetry Box Chapbook Prize.
Submission Period: Feb 1 – 28, 2021

First Prize:
$500 and 10 copies of their published chapbook PLUS distribution of their winning chapbook to ALL contest entrants.
Second Prize:
$100 and 5 copies of their published chapbook.
Third Prize:
$50 and 5 copies of their published chapbook.

This year’s judge will be Annie Lighthart.
The contest is open to poets residing within the United States and the winner will be announced in July.
Entry fee is $25 and all entrants receive a free physical copy of the winning chapbook mailed to them.

All guidelines and details on how to enter can be found at:

https://thepoetrybox.com/the-poetry-box-chapbook-prize-2021

PAST WINNERS

2020:
1st Prize: The Day of My First Driving Lesson by Tiel Aisha Ansari (Oregon)
2nd Prize: My Mother Never Died Before by Marcia Loughran (New York)
3rd Prize: Off Coldwater Canyon by C.W. Emerson (California)

2019:
1st Prize: Moroccan Holiday by Lauren Tivey (Florida)
2nd Prize: Hello, Darling by Christine Higgins (Maryland)
3rd Prize: Falling into the River by Debbie Hall (California)

2018:
1st Prize: Shrinking Bones by Judy K. Mosher (New Mexico)
2nd Prize: November Quilt by Penelope Scambly Schott (Oregon)
3rd Prize: 14: Antologia del Rio Grande by Christopher Bogart (New Jersey)
(tie) Fireweed by Gudrun Bortman (California)

Questions? Email [email protected]

PLEASE NOTE ALL SUBMISSIONS VIA SUBMITTABLE ONLY.

Feb
20
Sat
2021
Poems to Get us Through: The Best of Pandemic Poetry @ The Writer's Guild of Astoria, Oregon
Feb 20 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Poems to Get Us Through: The Best of Pandemic Poetry

Throughout the atrocities, hardships, and loss of 2020, many poets did what they do best: they wrote about what it was like to be alive. We’ll spend 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. PST together, marveling at pandemic poems written by Ada Limón, Jericho Brown, Dana Levin, Erika L. Sánchez, and Marcus Wicker. We’ll discuss how these poems move our bodies, hearts, and minds. We’ll also try on some 2020-themed writing of our own. No previous poetry experience is necessary. An openness to the power of language, however, is essential.

——-

Lauren Mallett (she/her/hers) is a poet, teacher, doula, and mushroom forager. She has lived and studied in Guanajuato and Xalapa, Mexico. Lauren taught dual-language immersion fifth grade in Richmond, California. She earned her MFA and was the Assistant Director of Creative Writing at Purdue University. Her poetry appears or is forthcoming in Poetry Northwest, Salamander, Passages North, Fugue, Tupelo Quarterly, and other journals. Lauren is a 2016 and 2019 Pushcart Prize nominee. She has taught for the Indiana Writers Center Summer Learning Programs, the Lafayette Writers’ Studio, and the Reynolds Young Writers Workshop. She lives on Oregon’s north coast, on the tribal lands of the Clatsop people.

Mar
20
Sat
2021
Making Art from Art: Mastering Ekphrastic Poetry @ Zoom
Mar 20 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Title: Making Art from Art: Mastering Ekphrastic Poetry

Time: Saturday, March 20, 2020 @ 1-4pm PST

Platform: Zoom

Tuition: $45

To register, email [email protected]
For more information, visit our Facebook event page at https://www.facebook.com/events/702345690456795/
About the Workshop:

Using a rhetorical device known as ekphrasis, the poet engages with a painting, drawing, sculpture, music, or other form of art in hopes of expanding on its meaning. Ekphrastic poets analyze the original artwork, explore symbolic meanings, invent stories, and even create dialog and dramatic scenes. The artwork will often lead the poet to new insights and surprising discoveries about the very nature of artistic creation and conversation.

In this intensive generative workshop, we will explore the many facets of ekphrasis through poetry/art/song analysis, active discussion, and a progressively challenging set of writing activities that create and foster conversation among multiple art forms.
We will study diverse ekphrastic poems from Anne Sexton, Edward Hirsch, Valerie Martinez, Blas Falconer, Carmen Gimenez Smith, Laurie Ann Guerrero, Gina Williams, and Ocean Vuong to see how they successfully explore fresh, unexpected methods of artistic translation and conversation.

Apr
7
Wed
2021
The Rules & How to Break Them: Creative Writing for Grades 6-12 @ Lafayette Writers' Studio
Apr 7 @ 4:00 pm – Apr 28 @ 5:30 pm

Writers are people who read, write, and rewrite. They know the rules. They know how—and when!—to break them. We’ll practice The Writing Life together during this online workshop. We’ll encourage each other’s writing dreams to take shape on the page.

———

How it works: In this workshop class we will meet four times in April for 1.5 hours. We will read and discuss poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction written by young writers. Lauren Mallett (she/her/hers), the instructor, will offer a framework for talking about the craft of each piece. We will use this framework to better understand how writing moves our hearts, minds, and bodies.

Each writer will have the option to share their own writing during each session. We will respond with claps, snaps, kudos, and/or details, depending on the writer’s feedback preferences.

Each session will feature reading, writing, revision, and celebration. Lauren will share links and resources for further exploration, as well as answer questions regarding revision, publication, and writing opportunities.

Who is the Instructor?

Lauren Mallett’s (she/her/hers) poems appear or are forthcoming in Poetry Northwest, Salamander, RHINO, Fugue, Passages North, and other journals. She has taught for the Reynolds Young Writers Workshop since 2008. Lauren taught dual-language immersion fifth grade in Richmond, CA from 2010-2013. She earned her MFA and was the Assistant Director of Creative Writing at Purdue University. She is a 2016 and 2019 Pushcart Prize nominee. Lauren lives on Oregon’s north coast, on the traditional homelands of the Clatsop people. Her current obsessions are banana slugs and fly amanita mushrooms. She believes that deep listening and trust are the encouragement we all need to tell our stories.

When is this class offered?

This class is offered virtually and meets from 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. EST on four Wednesdays in April: 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, and 4/28. It is open to writers ages 11-18 who are interested in writing and learning more about creative writing. The class is capped at 12 students and registration closes one week prior to the start of class. Three scholarships are available for BIPOC, Queer, and/or Trans writers (please contact Lauren at mallett [dot] lauren [at] gmail [dot] com for scholarship enrollment details). Tuition includes the option to meet with Lauren for a 30-minute, one-on-one conference via Zoom or phone during the first and/or last week of the workshop.

Apr
17
Sat
2021
Poems to Get Us Through: The Best of Pandemic Poetry @ The Writer's Guild of Astoria (via ZOOM)
Apr 17 all-day

Poems to Get Us Through: The Best of Pandemic Poetry

Throughout the atrocities, hardships, and loss of 2020, many poets did what they do best: they wrote about what it was like to be alive. We’ll spend 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. PST together, marveling at pandemic poems written by Ada Limón, Jericho Brown, Dana Levin, Erika L. Sánchez, and Marcus Wicker. We’ll discuss how these poems move our bodies, hearts, and minds. We’ll also try on some 2020-themed writing of our own. No previous poetry experience is necessary. An openness to the power of language, however, is essential.

——-

Lauren Mallett (she/her/hers) is a poet, teacher, doula, and mushroom forager. She has lived and studied in Guanajuato and Xalapa, Mexico. Lauren taught dual-language immersion fifth grade in Richmond, California. She earned her MFA and was the Assistant Director of Creative Writing at Purdue University. Her poetry appears or is forthcoming in Poetry Northwest, Salamander, Passages North, Fugue, Tupelo Quarterly, and other journals. Lauren is a 2016 and 2019 Pushcart Prize nominee. She has taught for the Indiana Writers Center Summer Learning Programs, the Lafayette Writers’ Studio, and the Reynolds Young Writers Workshop. She lives on Oregon’s north coast, on the tribal lands of the Clatsop people.

Apr
25
Sun
2021
Call for poems in response to a painting and/or a song
Apr 25 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This year the Mid-Valley Poetry Society’s spring Poetry in Performance program will be a Zoom event, held Sunday, April 25, from 2 to 4 p.m. It will focus on the theme “Healing Fractures” and will feature presentations by Salem painter and writer Cynthia Herron and singer-songwriter Kristen Grainger of the folk-bluegrass group True North.

In anticipation of this program, the MVPS is inviting poets to write poems in response to a visual work, “Low Field with Mended Oak Leaf,” by Cynthia Herron and/or a song, “The Ghost of Abuelito,” by Kristen Grainger. (Abuelito is Spanish for grandpa or granddad – an affectionate variant of abuelo/grandfather.) Then attend the April 25th event and perform the poems during the open mic segment of the program.

Three images of Herron’s work are attached – one showing the entire painting and two showing details of different areas. What the images on a flat screen can’t show: It’s 24” W x 20” H and nearly two inches thick; the niche in the center is six inches square and about an inch and a half deep.

To hear Grainger’s song in a performance with the True North band, enter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awdcRGNcOzA in your web browser.

These two works, the visual piece and the song, inspired the idea of a Poetry in Performance program on the theme of “Healing Fractures.” We hope that one or both will inspire you to write a poem in response and that you will share the poem(s) during the open mic segment of the April 25th program.

Please share this call with other poets you know. More information on the entire program will follow soon.

Jun
5
Sat
2021
III Concurso de Poesia Oregoniana 2021 + contest
Jun 5 @ 11:09 pm – Jun 6 @ 12:09 am

III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana – 2021
Bases del III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana
El Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana (ICO) que apunta a difundir, promocionar y alentar la poesía escrita en castellano desde el estado de Oregón, convoca al III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana, 2021.

Reglas
Podrán concursar autores radicados en Oregón, con un poema escrito en castellano, y cuyos derechos no hayan sido cedidos a ningún editor y no hayan sido publicados.
El autor utilizará un pseudónimo, y podrá participar con una obra original e inédita que no sobrepase las 300 palabras. El tema es libre.
El poema deberá ser enviado a través de la página web http://www.oregoniana.org
Los participantes, con su inscripción, autorizan la difusión virtual o física del poema y ceden los derechos del mismo al Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana.
El plazo de presentación finaliza el 20 de agosto de 2021
Criterios indicadores, puntaje
La calificación se realizará de acuerdo a los siguientes criterios:

Técnica
Creatividad
Corrección ortográfica y sintaxis
La aplicación, en forma correcta, de las normas ortográficas y el uso adecuado del lenguaje, salvo cuando se utilice neologismos o expresiones populares, como recursos poéticos
Cartel del Concurso
Cartel del III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana en PDF

III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana
III Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana

Fallo del jurado y entrega de premios
El fallo del jurado se hará público el 18 de septiembre de 2021, y la decisión será inapelable pudiendo quedar el premio o los premios desiertos si el jurado lo estima necesario.

La fecha de la entrega de premios se hará en el mes de octubre de este 2021. El día, lugar y hora están por determinar debido al COVID-19 y serán previamente anunciados en esta página y en nuestro Facebook. Será necesaria la presencia de la persona galardonada o de un representante.

En caso de no comparecer, el premio quedará desierto. El hecho de participar en este concurso supone la aceptación de las presentes bases.

El ICO podrá o no publicar los poemas presentados en este concurso.

Premio
El premio será la promoción especial de la persona galardonada en la publicación de una antología de la poesía oregoniana con los mejores poemas escogidos por el jurado.

Se otorgarán 10 copias al ganador, 5 copias al segundo lugar y 3 copias al tercer lugar. El libro se pondrá a la venta al público a un precio módico.

Colabora
El instituto de Cultura Oregoniana tiene el placer de contar con la colaboración del Oregon Poetry Association para la difusión de este concurso

Jul
7
Wed
2021
“Mastering Traditional Poetry Forms” Workshop with John Sibley Williams
Jul 7 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Title: Mastering Traditional Poetry Forms: Haiku, Sonnet, Ghazal, & Pantoum

Two Workshop Times:

Wednesdays, July 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2021 @ 2-4pm PST

or

Fridays, August 6, 13, 20, and 27, 2021 @ 2-4pm PST

Platform: Zoom

Tuition: $150

To register, email [email protected]

Our last workshops sold out, so register soon!

More information available at: https://www.johnsibleywilliams.com/upcoming-classes.

About the Workshop:

In the words of Mark Strand and Eavan Boland, “Forms are not locks, but keys. They don’t just open doors; they can start a journey and ultimately determine where you land.”

A poem can contain many elements to give it structure. Rhyme, meter, sound, repetition, experimentation, and so many others bring us back to poetry’s roots in traditional oral forms of storytelling. And there are so many profound reasons why traditional forms have survived the centuries, inspiring new poets and evolving to fit modern modes.

In this intensive, four-class workshop, we will explore the many facets of the haiku, sonnet, ghazal, and pantoum form, focusing on our personal relationships with sound and rhythm and refining our relationships with form and content. We will learn the rules, yes, and when best to break them, fostering a new understanding of and appreciation for these unique poetic approaches.

AIMS:

· to introduce the conventions of the haiku, sonnet, ghazal, and pantoum forms and how these rules can support your own themes, experiences, and ideas

· to introduce a number of strategies to get into a traditional poetry writing ‘headspace’

· to equip you with creative techniques to generate initial ideas and images

· to develop your ability to shape your initial ideas into strong first drafts

THE WORKSHOP INCLUDES:

· Weekly 120-minute live writing workshop with Q&A

· Multiple writing activities each session

· Professional critique of one new poem each week

· Bonus exercise provided between sessions

· Active discussion of sample poems from diverse contemporary poets

· A chance to more intimately engage with a small, focused writing community

About the Teacher

John Sibley Williams is the author of six collections, including The Drowning House (Elixir Press Poetry Award), As One Fire Consumes Another (Orison Poetry Prize), Skin Memory (Backwaters Prize, University of Nebraska Press), and Summon (JuxtaProse Chapbook Prize). A twenty-six-time Pushcart nominee, John is the winner of numerous awards, including the Wabash Prize for Poetry, Philip Booth Award, Phyllis Smart-Young Prize, and Laux/Millar Prize. He serves as editor of The Inflectionist Review and founder of the Caesura Poetry Workshop series. Previous publishing credits include Best American Poetry, Yale Review, Verse Daily, North American Review, Prairie Schooner, and TriQuarterly.